Premiere:

NITEFISH - »Youth Offgrid«


Today, Profet is hosting the premiere of the new single from electronic music creator NITEFISH, a short and intense paramagnetic punk peculiarity entitled »Youth Offgrid«. To mark the occasion, Profet's Chief Ideologue Filip Lindström meets NITEFISH for an interview, discussing the modern shape of punk and the possibility of change in the world. Read, and listen to NITEFISH's new track for the first time, here on Profet. Enjoy!

NITEFISH. Photo: Nanna (@nanna.h) & Clio (@p.avlidis)

NITEFISH is quite an eclectic performer, usually combining frantic lyrics yelled out over merciless dynamo drums with feverish flashes of video visuals, making the total experience of his work something like dragging yourself through a locked down arcade, looking for an angry fix.
        I meet up with the fish himself for an interview in his hometown of Stockholm, where he just moved back after living in Dublin. The topic of discussion is his brand new single, premiering today here on Profet.
        »’Youth Offgrid’ is the name of the song, and essentially it’s about finding hope in hopelessness« NITEFISH says, going on to describe the background story of the new track: »I had done ‘Fast Fashion’, my very industrial EP from last year, much because of the shut in vibes coming from the pandemic. After that, I started thinking about what punk music should be, and I wanted to capture the euphoric feeling of actually being able to do something. It’s all about daring to feel hope, because sometimes that feels impossible.«

NITEFISH. Photo: Roisín (@imagery.by.ro)

I find his interpretation of the punk phenomenon both uplifting and truthful, light years away from the common misconception of punk being only young angry men, wearing mohawks and leather jackets while playing consciously sloppy songs on loud electric guitars. If the punk spirit would have only taken its form in that type of (quite outdated) Sid Vicious-esque, rebel-without-a-cause culture, then I would have agreed with the numerous voices around the music world saying that punk is dead. When talking to NITEFISH though, I realize that the punk Geist succumbs to no specific master forever. Rather, it travels from bearer to bearer, making it difficult to spot if not for an experienced eye. Behind his shiny goggles, NITEFISH has a set of those, and so he is highly capable of pointing out the shape of punk of now, maybe even of the one to come. As for now, »punk« means »hope«, and the hope in question is the notion of belief in one’s own ability to inflict change on one’s surroundings, no matter the disastrous characteristics of the circumstances.
        »The world is shit, but we don’t care about that« NITEFISH says to sum the whole thing up. »Punk is about action and feeling. It’s more of an attitude than a genre by now.«
        There you have it, dear readers; the state of punk as of 2021. It isn’t necessarily channelled through a definite visual or musical medium, like it once was, which NITEFISH is a living proof of. His music bears greater resemblance with Estonian Euro Trap Rappers and epileptic video games than with anything the likes of The Exploited ever put out, but nevertheless it’s punk. His lyrics are ironically politic at times, rather than blatantly explicit.
        »I make fun of my wanting change, but at the same time I embrace it« NITEFISH enigmatically explains. »I want to use irony, not in a self-destructive way but in a positive direction, where you can dare to dream about a better world but also bring change in your own life even if it feels totally impossible. That’s what I’m trying to mediate. Even if you don’t catch up on that element in the lyrics, you will at least get the energy from the music.«

NITEFISH. Photo: Roisín (@imagery.by.ro)

He further explains the new single’s title, »Youth Offgrid«, as being a description of the mode we have gone into now, when the pandemic has just started losing its grip of the world. After being isolated and forced to digital socialization, the track title’s undefined youth can now leave its online imprisonment, and may in doing so better their chances of achieving the change that comes with the 21st century incarnation of punk.
        NITEFISH compares this emancipation to what has happened after other major historic events of the catastrophic kind, in the way that the end of an international crisis can assist in birthing global creativity. I can’t help thinking of (one of) Tyler Durden’s riveting speech(es) in »Fight Club«, in which he states that himself and the rest of the members of his generation are »the middle children of history« and that they »have no Great War, no Great Depression. Our great war is a spiritual war, our great depression is our lives.« Now, in comparison to Durden’s days, there is obviously a great depression to recover from. If I understand NITEFISH’s theory correctly, this fact will fuel the punk ethos and all of its creative outlets. Hopefully, this current case won’t end up like in the opening lines of Allen Ginsberg’s 1956 poem »Howl«, the masterpiece depicting a wave of artists who actually had a great war to follow: »I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked«.

NITEFISH. Photo: Nanna (@nanna.h) & Clio (@p.avlidis)

Since it was after moving from Stockholm to Dublin a few years back that NITEFISH started creating the hard-knock beats that we can hear on »Youth Offgrid«, as well as on the before mentioned EP »Fast Fashion« and a few antecedent singles, I ask him what living in Ireland’s capital has done to affect his music making.
        »There is a sense of solidarity in Dublin’s underground music scene, and in society overall, because things are so fucked« he answers. »The rents are sky high, and lots of live music venues get shut down. So, there is an insurgent feeling among the younger generation, a thought of it being ‘us against the world’. That has really influenced me.«
        In a way, Dublin symbolizes what I figure NITEFISH is all about: Poor conditions lead to the urge for change, and the need to follow this change through with others in the same situation. Such a togetherness is the perfect engine for modern punk, and NITEFISH revs it to a full throttle. Hear the mechanic solidarity roar, on »Youth Offgrid«, right now.

July 9 2021